Humans Can’t Help It

From the dawn of time, human beings have organized themselves into tribes. Anthropologists tell us that early humans formed bands of 30 – 40 people all hunting, gathering, and living together.  While early groups varied according to environmental and cultural practices, the concept of tribe is a near universal. 

For as long as we’ve existed we’ve relied on each other to survive.

More recently, psychologist Abraham Maslow described belonging as fundamental to the human hierarchy of needs. According to Maslow intimate relationships and friendships are foundational human psychological needs.  

Human beings can’t help it: we need to belong.

Tribes

Technology and civilization haven’t eliminated the tribe. If anything, tribes are more important than ever.  In his book Tribes: Why You Need Us to Lead, Seth Godin, explains how tribes are something more than bands of people looking to survive.  According to Godin a tribe is “a group of people connected to one another, connected to a leader, and connected to an idea.”  Godin emphasizes that tribes are grounded in a shared interest and supported by a common way to communicate. Most importantly, Godin tells us that tribes need leadership. It is the leader’s responsibility to provide “connection and growth and something new.”

Tribe SLA

Shafer Leadership Academy introduced our membership option this year. We were a little uncertain about how our supporters, participants, and stakeholders would respond. It took an act of courage by our board to change our model in hopes of providing people a way to connect and grow. It turns out that we were on to something as our membership model outperformed projections by nearly 80%. 

I think that’s because an SLA membership taps into our ancient need for a tribe.

By providing our members a place to gather 2 – 3 times a month to think about leadership, we are providing community leaders a place to gather in service of a shared interest.

The people, and organizations, who attend our programs come together because they are passionate about improvement. They seek to improve themselves, their workplaces, and our community.  .

Our members are forming a tribe. It is a tribe of like minded people who passionately believe that quality leadership can impact every corner and quarter of community.  It is a tribe of people who understand that how we think about ourselves, and how we treat others, truly matters.  It is a tribe of people who realize that as President Kennedy once said, “leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.”

Our is an unsettled tribe. Our is a tribe that is constantly seeking to connect with others. Our is a tribe who seeks to promote growth within themselves, their organizations, and their community.  

We invite you to join our tribe.

Now is the time to think about a 2020 membership in Shafer Leadership Academy.  Now is the time to consider what tribe you will join next year. Now is the time to find other people, and organizations, who share your values. Now is the time to gain new tools. Now is the time to grow and connect. 

Click here to learn more about our membership options. 

Current members contact Mitch to renew your membership.


About the author:

Mitch Isaacs was named Shafer Leadership Academy’s Executive Director in May 2015. In this role, he works closely with the organization’s board of directors to fulfill the mission of the organization. He is responsible for creating vision, connecting with stakeholders, administering program offerings and leading the organization in meaningful ways. 


The Right Room

I recently had the opportunity to travel to Harvard University to complete a course through their School of Extended Education. I signed up for the class because I keep finding myself in a role I never expected to play – consultant. Shafer Leadership Academy’s public classes in leadership have opened doors to providing those same classes privately to interested organizations. As our reputation for offering content both publicly and privately has grown, organizations have come to us asking us to help them solve specific problems.

And as a nonprofit organization we like to help.

As result, when funding became available through the Ball Brothers Foundation, I jumped at the opportunity to take the “Consultant’s Toolkit” last month in Cambridge. I know enough about consulting to realize that there is so much more to learn, and what better place to go than Harvard to learn it?

From Greens Fork to Cambridge

To be honest, I was as intimidated as I was excited to attend. As a first-generation college student from Greens Fork, Indiana there was a part of me that didn’t feel qualified to even step on campus. Harvard, after all, is a world renown haven for stunning intelligence, deep history, and rich tradition. I was concerned that it would be too esoteric and inaccessible for my Midwestern tastes.

Another part of me was concerned that I couldn’t keep up. How would I handle myself in a classroom full of bright, motivated people from across the world? What could I possibly have to contribute to the conversation? Would I able to follow along? Would I be able to learn, or would I be lost?

Opportunity Over Insecurity

Then I remembered this quote: “If you’re the smartest person in the room, you’re in the wrong room.

People who know everything have nothing to learn. There is no opportunity for growth, if there is no room for growth.  When you find yourself in a space where you are unquestionably among intelligent, high performers, then you are presented with an incredible opportunity – the opportunity to grow.

I found myself in the right room at Harvard.

In two short days I learned helpful techniques to improve my consulting practice. I met brilliant people, working in diverse industries. I participated in activities which connected the classroom concepts with everyday experience. I even had the satisfaction of learning that my consulting process is generally “right” even if it needs some tweaks.

Most importantly, I was reminded to not let insecurity keep me from opportunity.

Rooms where we feel smart are safe rooms. They are comfortable rooms, but they are not rooms where we grow. Challenge creates change. Discomfort can encourage expansion.  

And at the very least, there’s nothing like drinking coffee at Harvard Square.

Contact me if you’d like to learn more about our consulting services.


About the author:

Mitch Isaacs was named Shafer Leadership Academy’s Executive Director in May 2015. In this role, he works closely with the organization’s board of directors to fulfill the mission of the organization. He is responsible for creating vision, connecting with stakeholders, administering program offerings and leading the organization in meaningful ways. 


A Book From Branam

As many of you know our community lost a giant in March, when Dr. George Branam passed away.

You may not know, however, that George was a founding board member of Shafer Leadership Academy.

Coffees with George

In fact, George was a part of the board who hired me. Over the years George and I would meet regularly to discuss leadership, talk about the community, and engage in spirited debate about politics. He would often tell me that if you aren’t a liberal when you are young then you don’t have a heart and if you aren’t a conservative when you’re old you don’t have a brain. I usually responded by saying I wanted to have both.

No matter what we discussed, or when we agreed, I always looked forward to my coffees with George. George had a passion for leadership. He said, more than once, that leadership is everything. He felt that future of our community hinged on the quality of its leadership, and on that point, we always agreed.

At some point in our conversations George would recommend a book or article for further exploration. George was a voracious reader and a lifelong learner. He wanted others to continue learning as well.  George valued self-improvement.

A Book from Branam

So, I was delighted when his wife, Linda, reached out to me a few weeks after his passing to offer books from his leadership library.  I visited their home, had a lovely conversation with Linda which felt a little like the conversations I used to have with George, and left with a trunk full of books.

It took a while to figure out what to do with them.

Eventually, I realized I should do what George always did with his knowledge– I should share it.

So, in honor of George’s spirit, and memory, we offer you a Book from Branam.  We invite you to follow in George’s footstep by contributing to his legacy of leadership. 

We gave many of these books away at our Annual Meeting on Monday but we have a limited number still available at our offices. Many of the books have handwritten notes from George in them, along with underlines and highlights. George didn’t just own these books, he consumed them.

 

We invite you to visit our offices, take a book, read it, and then pass it on.  Just as George always passed his knowledge on to all of us.

George may be gone, but his legacy lives on.

Contact me if you’d like to schedule a time to select a book.


About the author:

Mitch Isaacs was named Shafer Leadership Academy’s Executive Director in May 2015. In this role, he works closely with the organization’s board of directors to fulfill the mission of the organization. He is responsible for creating vision, connecting with stakeholders, administering program offerings and leading the organization in meaningful ways. 


A Ruler for Your Emotions

People sometimes come to Shafer Leadership Academy with the hope we will help them control others. First, we talk with them about controlling themselves. 

It’s not always the message they want to hear, but it’s usually the one they need to hear.

We can’t lead others until we lead ourselves or, as my uncle often asked me:

What are you doing to keep your side of the street clean?”

A Simple Tool

Emotional Intelligence is defined as “the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves, and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.”  

David Neidert, author and facilitator for Shafer Leadership Academy, shares this helpful tool during our upcoming Emotional Intelligence session on April 25th from 8:30 AM – 4:00 PM.

It’s called the “RULER Reminder,” and it’s useful when we find ourselves in emotional situations.

RULER stands for:

 


Recognize emotions in self and others by examining face, body, voice tones, and feelings;

Understand how these emotions influence us;

Label the emotions by expanding our vocabulary as precisely as possible;

Express appropriate behaviors in the context and culture; within cultural rules;

Regulate by developing strategies for how you might respond (e.g., positive self-talk, exercise,  visualizations, walking, journaling, etc.)


Keep Your Side of the Street Clean

The RULER Reminder represents four basic dimensions of Emotional Intelligence:

1) Self Awareness;

2) Self-Management;

3) Social Awareness and;

4) Relationship Management.  

Self-Awareness is the first step toward better Emotional Intelligence. It’s how we keep our side of the street clean.

Enhance your Emotional Intelligence 

Emotional Intelligence is a challenging topic. It requires a mixture of thinking, self-reflection and intentional action. Fortunately, you don’t have to do this work alone. We, at Shafer Leadership Academy, are ready to walk alongside you. (or: are ready to pick up a broom. Let’s go clean some streets!

Click here to learn how you can attend Emotional Intelligence: Discovering You on April 25th.

Scholarships are available!


About the author:

Mitch Isaacs was named Shafer Leadership Academy’s Executive Director in May 2015. In this role, he works closely with the organization’s board of directors to fulfill the mission of the organization. He is responsible for creating vision, connecting with stakeholders, administering program offerings and leading the organization in meaningful ways.  Learn more about Mitch »


Leadership is Service

You can learn a lot about leaders by the way they talk. Some leaders believe their position entitles them to demand respect and command others. These leaders talk about “being in charge,” refer to “directing others,” or “setting people straight.” They don’t seek input from those they lead. They cast a vision rooted in personal greatness, rather than shared aspirations. 

That’s not the kind of approach we teach at Shafer Leadership Academy.

We believe in change, not the status quo. We believe in the strength of community, not the isolation of individuals. We believe in the wisdom of teams, not in the greatness of a single person. We believe that all voices have something to contribute. 

We Empower and Equip Servant Leaders

“The difference manifests itself in the care taken by the servant-first to make sure that other people’s highest priority needs are being served. The best test, and difficult to administer, is: Do those served grow as persons? Do they, while being served, become healthier, wiser, freer, more autonomous, more likely themselves to become servants?”  

-Robert Greenleaf, father of servant leadership

 

We believe that servant leadership transforms our businesses, organizations and communities. We believe that servant leaders are on a constant journey of self-discovery, while simultaneously striving to better serve those around them. We believe leaders don’t have all the answers, nor do they need to. We believe leaders understand how to tap into the strengths of those around them to solve common problems by creating a shared vision. We believe leaders see themselves as responsible to those they serve. And by doing this, we believe we can control our destiny.

An Introduction to Servant Leadership

For 12 years, Shafer Leadership Academy has offered the Emergence class as an introduction to servant leadership and an exercise in self discovery.

Emergence is Shafer Leadership Academy’s core leadership program. Topics during the interactive sessions, include learning and leadership styles, effective communication, consensus building, conflict management, civic leadership and personal mission.

Among our nearly 450 graduates, 75 percent have assumed a leadership role in the community, 50 percent are serving on nonprofit boards and 40 percent have experienced a job promotion, all within five years of completing the program.

Every year, Emergence brings the best of our community together: leaders from places of worship, from nonprofits, from elected offices, from industries, and from schools. Participants seek to better understand themselves and to serve others.


Learn more and register for Emergence and other SLA programs.

Questions? Email Shafer Leadership Academy or call the office at 765-748-0403. 

 


Inspire a Shared Vision

Imagine a clear eyed, motivated leader traveling down a path towards a better future. Fueled by certainty they move swiftly, taking long strides and feeling more confident with each step, until eventually, they turn around and realize no one is there.

Vision is essential to leadership. Leaders need a clear picture of the future they hope to create. But what happens when a leader has a vision and can’t get others to share in it?

A leader without followers is just a person taking a walk.

Envision and Elicit

According to Kouzes and Posner, the authors of The Leadership Challenge:

“Leaders who Inspire a Shared Vision passionately believe that they can make a difference. They envision the future, creating an ideal and unique image of what the organization can become. Through their magnetism and quiet persuasion, leaders enlist others in their dreams. They breathe life into their visions and get people to see exciting possibilities for the future.”

Leaders are thirsty for a better future. Their vision emanates from a desire to make the world a better place. A vision, at its core, is a dream. A dream of a stronger community, a more effective workplace, or a better family.  When we clearly envision the future, we can describe it in rich detail. In fact, we can’t help but talk about our vision. Eventually we are inhabited by it. A true vision fuels the best parts of our soul and stirs us to action.

But a great vision can’t just stir us, we have to enlist others to the cause.

We must inspire a shared vision. Nothing is accomplished alone. No matter how great it is, without others, a vision is simply an unrealized dream. And while dreams are nice, change requires action. We have to create space for others; we have to listen; we have to truly share our vision if we ever want it to be a reality.

Let’s Create a Shared Vision

Imagine a community of people interested in creating a shared vision. What would happen if we tackled problems together, rather than wait for unsatisfying solutions to be forced upon us?

What would happen if we all learned to Inspire a Shared Vision?

Click here to learn more about how you can Inspire a Shared Vision.

Inspire a Shared Vision, along with Model the Way, Enable Others to Act, Challenge the Process and Encourage the Heart are the Five Exemplary Practices first outlined by Kouzes and Posner over 30 years ago in their landmark book “The Leadership Challenge.”

Shafer Leadership Academy will offer a one day Leadership Challenge course on Tuesday, September 18th at the Innovation Connector.

Scholarships are available.


About the author:

Mitch Isaacs was named Shafer Leadership Academy’s Executive Director in May 2015. In this role, he works closely with the organization’s board of directors to fulfill the mission of the organization. He is responsible for creating vision, connecting with stakeholders, administering program offerings and leading the organization in meaningful ways.  Learn more about Mitch »


You’re Not A Superhero

It’s easy to believe that leaders are superheroes — people with special powers who can swoop in to solve any problem quickly and with few consequences.

The problem is, you’re not a superhero.  

Capes Don’t Fit

I’ve tried on the cape. It doesn’t fit. As a younger man, I thought leading meant having to solve everyone’s problems. Or, even worse, when a problem developed, I pressured myself to tackle it all on my own.

Eventually, I realized that leaders solve problems by building great teams. I had to reframe my concept of a hero.

Enable Others to Act

Real superheroes don’t have super strength, they gather strength from creating strong teams. Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner, authors of The Leadership Challenge, suggest that real superheroes enable others to act.

“Leaders foster collaboration and build spirited teams,” the book states. “They actively involve others. Leaders understand that mutual respect is what sustains extraordinary efforts; they strive to create an atmosphere of trust and human dignity. They strengthen others, making each person feel capable and powerful.”

Fonder of the Servant Leadership movement, Robert Greenleaf said the test of a good leader is whether those served “grow as persons.” “Do they, while being served, become healthier, wiser, freer, more autonomous, more likely themselves to become servants?” he wrote. 

Take Your Leadership to New Heights

Our upcoming program, The Leadership Challenge, will empower you to embrace the five practices of exemplary leadership: Inspire a Shared Vision, Model the Way, Enable Others to Act, Challenge the Process and Encourage the Heart.

Scholarships are available for this program, from 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 18, at Muncie’s Innovation Connector.

REGISTER TODAY  


About the author:

Mitch Isaacs was named Shafer Leadership Academy’s Executive Director in May 2015. In this role, he works closely with the organization’s board of directors to fulfill the mission of the organization. He is responsible for creating vision, connecting with stakeholders, administering program offerings and leading the organization in meaningful ways.  Learn more about Mitch »


A Lesson in Local Governnment

As a young professional, one of my mentors would ask, “Is this the hill you want to die on?” When something appears to be unjust or unfair, I speak up. Now that I’m older, I’ve realized unbridled idealism isn’t always practical.  At times it is easier to swim with the current than against it. Quiet acceptance seems to make life easier and you tend to end up with more friends, because you’re less controversial.   Everyone wins, right?

Not always. 

Last year, I witnessed what I believe to be inappropriate behavior that challenging publicly might qualify me as “dying on a hill,” and I feel the need to speak out, to start climbing that hill.  The behavior demonstrated in my presence is challenging to put words around. As Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart famously said when the Court struggled to define obscenity, he “knew it when he saw it.”  In this incident, I too know what I saw.

I’ve recounted the experience with a few of my trusted advisors, many of whom have community influence, respect & positional power representing different backgrounds and walks of life. One of those advisors, simply looked at me said, “So what are you going to do? No one says anything because everyone is too afraid to speak up.”

I sat with that question for a while.

The Battle Over Our Silence

I’m not going to share in this blog the details of what happened.  The details don’t really matter and it’s not always about what you know, it’s what you know you can prove. There’s a process in place and people that have their point of view to protect. That’s not a battle, for me to fight or likely win. I have however, found my voice.

But I think there is a more important battle that we can all win: the battle over our silence.

Winston Churchill famously said, “Democracy is the worst form of government possible, except all the others.”

Democracy isn’t perfect, but it’s our best option, but it only works when we participate. It calls us to wake up, pay attention and engage. Democracy means you have a voice but only if you use it. When the framers said for the people and by the people they were talking about YOU.

You are the people.

Maybe you’re like me, maybe you’re skeptical about the questionable practices in your community. Or perhaps, you’ve seen or heard something but you are too scared to speak up. Perhaps you’ve decided it was a hill you didn’t want to climb or die on.  Maybe you’ve stayed silent because you just don’t think that speaking up will ever truly matter. I wouldn’t blame you if you’ve felt any of those things. I know I’ve felt them all.

Yet our silence only contributes to a culture where complaints go ignored, accountability lacks and vocal opposition remains intimidating. If we remain silent, then we are complicit. We become accomplices in a system where those in power act without concern or accountability.

We get the representation we deserve.

Use Your Voice

The next time you witness someone with power & influence abusing their power, or the next time you feel ignored or intimidated for using your voice, then I encourage you to lead with your internal strength and use it anyway. Hiking up a hill is much more enjoyable with others. Let’s challenge each other to live and work more authentically as we work to advance our great city and improve lives in the community.

And if you are a person of influence, I ask that you listen to those who speak their voice.  Conduct the due diligence to look into their claims and when you find the truth, seek the appropriate and just outcome.

And if we die on the hills we chose to climb, so be it. After all, hills are where our heroes are buried.   We all have opportunities to lean in, take the chance and be one of those heroes.

Summit on Transparency in Local Government

Shafer Leadership Academy is proud to partner with Muncie Action Plan and the Bowen Center at Ball State University on the upcoming Citizen Summit on Transparency in Local Government

The Summit, which is sponsored by Ivy Tech Community College, will be hosted at the recently renovated John and Janice Fisher Building on Saturday, September 14th. The purpose of the summit is to explore solution-focused, and nonpartisan, opportunities to foster transparency in local government. 

The Summit is free and open to the public. You can learn more here.


About the author:

Mitch Isaacs was named Shafer Leadership Academy’s Executive Director in May 2015. In this role, he works closely with the organization’s board of directors to fulfill the mission of the organization. He is responsible for creating vision, connecting with stakeholders, administering program offerings and leading the organization in meaningful ways.  Learn more about Mitch »


Our Time with MCS

Shafer Leadership Academy recently participated in the orientation for the newly installed Muncie Community Schools Board. Long-time Emergence facilitator, Pat Heiny, and I were invited to bookend the day’s activities with teambuilding exercises and leadership training to promote effective communication and positive, productive relationships.

Some of you may know Pat Heiny. She is a partner with Contemporary Consulting, based in Richmond, and is a lead facilitator for Shafer Leadership Academy’s Emergence program. In addition to her nearly 30 years of leadership development experience, Pat spent 12 years on the Richmond Community School Board, which included a term as board president. In 2010, the Indiana School Boards Association recognized Pat’s dedication to Richmond schools with the Outstanding Boardsman Ship Award. She was the perfect facilitator for our time with the Muncie Community Schools Board.

Committed, Collaborative, and Value-Oriented

But this post isn’t about Pat or Shafer Leadership Academy. This post is about the Muncie Community Schools Board.

Each member of the board came across as bright, committed, collaborative and value-oriented. It was immediately clear to me that they bring different perspectives but share highly complementary skill sets. Their conversation and comments focused on all the right things and demonstrated they understand their purpose and appreciate the challenges ahead. They spoke honestly about their hopes and fears, and they honored each other’s perspectives and expertise.

Most importantly, without a doubt, it was clear they are here for our kids.

What Ball State Brings

I should add that this orientation took place at Ball State and was planned by a team of Ball State staff members. Every part of the orientation was professional and on-point. The facility was well suited for the occasion, the materials were clear and accurate, and the schedule was perfectly paced. The team soaked up guidance from top-notch facilitators who engaged them in a variety of topics.

I have friends and colleagues who have thoughtful concerns about the new relationship between Ball State University and Muncie Community Schools. I’m not here to discount them or those fears, but I do want to share how encouraging it was to see — first hand — Ball State’s tremendous resources (of staff, facilities and expertise) focused on improving our schools. Watching the relationship in action helped me understand just how much Ball State brings to Muncie Community Schools.

A Bright Future

Speaking of action, I finished the day watching the new board get to work. In their very first public meeting, and under tremendous public scrutiny, they efficiently elected officers, heard a detailed financial report, asked questions, recognized new staff members, intently listened to community feedback, and responded to questions from the media in public. They also voted to move their meetings from monthly to bi-weekly, and to add public comments at the first of the agenda so they could hear the public’s remarks before making decisions.

Everything I saw from this board demonstrated that this is a new era, full of potential for Muncie Community Schools. I have decided they deserve Shafer Leadership Academy’s support, and we stand ready to help however needed.

I hope you take the time to attend a school board meeting to experience their passion and expertise with your own eyes. I think you’ll see what I see: a bright future for Muncie Community Schools and Ball State — a community that is better together.


About the author:

Mitch Isaacs was named Shafer Leadership Academy’s Executive Director in May 2015. In this role, he works closely with the organization’s board of directors to fulfill the mission of the organization. He is responsible for creating vision, connecting with stakeholders, administering program offerings and leading the organization in meaningful ways.  Learn more about Mitch »


Are You MindFULL or Mindful?

My name is Mitch Isaacs, and I am overcommitted.

I am the executive director of a nonprofit and serve as an officer for three of the five board of directors on which I sit. I volunteer as a Big Brother, a Project Leadership Mentor, and the president of my neighborhood association. More importantly, I am a husband, a father, a son, and a friend. 

I love being involved (and wouldn’t have it any other way), but at times, I feel like a browser with too many tabs open. Can you relate? Do you struggle to balance your personal and professional aspirations? 

When our mind is full of things we have to do, there is no space to be the things we are. 

How Mindfulness Helps

So, what’s the answer? We could all use a refresher on time management best practices, sure. And sometimes, you have to make some difficult choices to cut out or reduce your commitments, but among all the solutions lies the ancient practice of meditation and mindfulness.

For thousands of years, people across the globe have used meditation and mindfulness to manage stress and seek clarity, and modern science has started to embrace these practices as part of a healthy, well-balanced life. Recent studies suggest mediation can:

1) Boost your immune system (see here)

2) Decrease your stress (see here)

3) Reduce distractions (see here)

4) Lower your heart rate and blood pressure (see here)

5) Provide clarity (see here)

Proven Results In My Life

If you would have said “meditation” around me a year ago, I would have pictured a person sitting crossed legged, wearing robes, sporting unkempt hair and repeating “oommmmm….” But then I tried it and opened myself up to learning more, after which I realized there are forms of meditation and approaches to mindfulness for everyone (so, not all poses and mantras).

Since incorporating meditation into my daily routine, my resting heart rate has gone down (ask my Apple Watch), I better manage disagreements with loved ones, and it’s easier for me to find clarity in the middle of a busy day at Shafer Leadership Academy. 

To help others see the benefits of mindfulness in their own lives, I reached Ball State University Counselors Amanda McErlean and Timothy Hess to lead an engaging and interactive mindfulness session during a free lunch and learn from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday, July 16, at the Innovation Connector. I had planned to plug the session in this blog post, but two days after posting it in an email, it was full. This reinforced we need to make more of these types of sessions available to our leaders in East Central Indiana.

Maybe It Can Help You Too

Meditation is not limited to mystical yogis, and a basic understanding of the practice just scratches the surface. As I said, learning more about meditation and mindfulness reveal there is an approach for people of all ages, backgrounds, personality types, and schedules.

There’s no magic pill to fix “over-committed,” but creating the space to better understand ourselves, our goals, and our tendencies is a start. It’s worked for me, and it can work for you.

Please reach out with ideas or hopes for future Shafer Leadership Academy programming related to mindfulness and meditation. I’m excited to hear your ideas!

Namaste.

Click here to learn how you can bring mindfulness to your organization!


About the author:

Mitch Isaacs was named Shafer Leadership Academy’s Executive Director in May 2015. In this role, he works closely with the organization’s board of directors to fulfill the mission of the organization. He is responsible for creating vision, connecting with stakeholders, administering program offerings and leading the organization in meaningful ways.  Learn more about Mitch »


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